Art in the Making

October 30, 2014—April 18, 2015

Opening Reception:

October 30, 2014, 6:00-8:30pm


artcritical.com

Making Art, and Making It Well: Two Recent Group Shows, By David Carrier

Friday, April 3, 2015

Some finished works of art efface evidence of the process of their own making. A painting by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres or Philip Pearlstein doesn’t reveal how it was made — in that way, it is like a photograph. There is, by contrast, a special fascination in art which, by revealing the activity of its own making, makes that process part of its meaning. Such art, it might be said, is the most aesthetic visual art — it is doubly art because we both identify its abstract or figurative subject and enjoy seeing how that subject was rendered. We find this happening with Abstract Expressionism, as represented at FreedmanArt’s “Art in the Making,” by marvelous signature style works by Adolph Gottlieb, Philip Guston, Hans Hofmann, Franz Kline, among others, and by artworks from artists of succeeding generations who extended that tradition.

FreedmanArt

We hope you will watch..., Art in the Making video

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

Tune in to our video presenting “Art in the Making,” a celebratory exhibition including the many views and voices coming from three time honored New York institutions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T-ZyJDjBTEM&feature=youtu.be

FreedmanArt

New exhibition: "Art in the Making," opening Thursday October 30, Reception from 6-8:30pm

FreedmanArt is pleased to present Art in the Making; an exhibition honoring art, the history of whose making is part of its meaning, with over twenty artists included. Art in the Making opens Thursday, October 30.

In a time of constant change and advances in the methods of “making,” this exhibition hopes to provide a lens into time-honored art institutions, as triggered by the overlapping of the 50th anniversary of the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting & Sculpture, and the 140th anniversary of The Art Students League of New York. This brings us to appreciate original and early approaches to teaching, learning, and making; as relevant today as in decades and centuries gone by.